Davis Quit as Brexit Secretary because May Gave Away ‘Too Much Too Easily’ to EU

Davis Quit as Brexit Secretary because May Gave Away ‘Too Much Too Easily’ to EU

David Davis, who resigned as Brexit Secretary late Sunday night, has explained the reason for quitting by stating that British Prime Minister Theresa May had “given away too much too easily” to the EU with her newly adopted Brexit plan.

Davis’ resignation came just 48 hours after Prime Minister Theresa May got the Cabinet to back her Brexit plan which stipulates “a free trade for goods” of the UK and the EU, while excluding the vast British services sector.

Davis has quickly been succeeded by the UK’s new Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab, previously Minister of State for Housing at the British Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.

He told the BBC in the interview he could not continue to serve as Britain’s Brexit Secretary since he did not believe in Prime Minister May’s plan for the future relations between the UK and the EU.

Last week, there were reports that Davis had warned May that the EU was certain to reject her plan.

Davis insisted that his resignation did not seek to undermine the British Prime Minister, and also expressed hopes it would help the UK prevent the EU from trying to get further concessions from it.

“We are not proposing to use the same rulebook, or the same laws, really, as the European Union, not equivalent, not similar but the same, and that will provide all sorts of problems when it comes to if we want to diverge or do something different. The return of control to Parliament is more illusionary that it is real,” Davis explained.

“Secondly, the customs arrangements – we will be collecting taxes, effectively tariffs, for the European Union. They are bound to insist on the European Court having a say in that, and that will be a problem in terms of bring back control of our laws and our borders,” he added.

“And, thirdly, the tactic. I am worried that what the European Union will do is simply take what we’ve offered and ask for more, or wait for more. And I think there’s got to be a time when we’ve got to be tougher with them, and this should be that time,” the now former British Brexit Secretary argued.

Davis also declared that he had lived with compromises in Brexit policy for the two years he served as Brexit Secretary of the UK but there came a point where these went “too far”.

“I worry about the fine detail and that it will not work out as we hope,” he said.

Davis insisted that May was a “good prime minister”, and any attempts to challenge her would be “not a good idea”.

Junior Brexit Minister Steve Baker who resigned shortly after Davis told the BBC’s Daily Politics that he had been “blindsided” by the Brexit proposal agreed at Chequers, Prime Minister May’s residence where she met with her Cabinet last Friday.

Baker said he and his team had been preparing a white paper “which did not accord with what has been put to the cabinet at Chequers”.

With respect to his replacement as Brexit Secretary, Davis stated that Raab would be “very effective” in the post.

“You hand over a job and tell him what the pitfalls are. That is what I will do,” he said regarding Raab, who once served as his chief of staff.

(Banner image: TV grab from the BBC)

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