Minting of Croatia Euro Coins Begins

Minting of Croatia Euro Coins Begins

Croatia officially begins minting its euro coins today. The Council of the European Union’s made a formal decision on Croatia’s admittance into the eurozone on January 1, 2023. The forging of Croatian euro coins becomes a major activity for the accomplishment of the euro’s introduction and cash replacement.

The Start of the Minting Process

Republic of Croatia Prime Minister Andrej Plenković and Croatian National Bank Governor Boris Vujčić visited the minting facilities where the euro coins are created. Along with them was the President of the Board of the Croatian Mint, Damir Bolta.

The minting finally started at the Croatian Mint in Sveta Nedelja near the City of Zagreb. It uses six presses, producing five to eight hundred coins in a minute. The factory can produce four million coins every day. Nearly 70 employees work on the release of the brand new coins in three shifts for the official change over the bloc’s single currency by 2023.

The plates used for the coins came from other European countries, through different tenders. The tool designed for the Croatia euro coin production was produced in the Republic of Croatia.

Timely Production of Croatia Euro Coins

This is an expedient creation and pre-release of the needed numbers of Croatian euro coins to banks. It would later be able to eventually pre-disburse business entities like shops and restaurants and a significant step in the system of replacing cash. According to the Croatian National Bank, this will ensure that people pay for the new banknotes of the unit in coins without hassle from the euro’s initial introduction.

The Croatian National Bank will make approximately 3,700 tons of euro coins to pre-furnish banks. It’s approximately exactly the weight of 88 new Zagreb trams. The mint, on the other hand, will need to produce a huge portion of that euro coins amount in less than six months.

“We are conducting the process of introducing the euro in a serious, structured and systematic manner, and I am using the opportunity to thank everyone who contributed to Croatia’s path to membership in the eurozone. We are continuing with activities that will ensure the timely exchange of cash throughout Croatia before and after joining the eurozone, and an integral part of this is the minting of euro and cent coins with the Croatian national side,” said Prime Minister Andrej Plenković.

In 1993, the Croatian Mint was founded as the Croatian Monetary Institute and was one of the significant foundations of establishing national identity. It’s been almost 30 years since its organization, the Croatian Mint will create Croatian euro coins. At the same time, it will promote Croatian symbols across Europe and partake in Croatia’s historical process in entering the European Union, added Plenković.

Coin Structure

The Croatia €1 coin has a pattern of a kuna or marten with a chessboard background on the Croatian national side. The €2 coin, on the other hand, exhibits the Croatian map, and the words regarding freedom from Ivan Gundulić’s Dubravka. The 10, 20, and 50 cents coins display Nikola Tesla on the  Croatian national side, while the one and two cent coins show the Glagolitic script image.

Image Source: Joanbanjo/WikimediaCommons (Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported)

 

 

newsletter
Join our mailing list and never miss an update !
Doubts Over Zaporizhzhia Inspection Length

Doubts Over Zaporizhzhia Inspection Length

The head of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Rafel Grossi, said it was a vast difference - now that independent experts are in the Russian-occupied Ukrainian nuclear

Fighting in Kherson Intensifies

Fighting in Kherson Intensifies

After the start of a counter-offensive in the Russian-occupied Ukrainian region of Kherson, according to information from Kyiv, there is now "heavy fighting" in the area. There were

IAEA on the way to Zaporizhia

IAEA on the way to Zaporizhia

For weeks there has been growing international concern about the Zaporizhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine, which is under Russian control. An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) delegation