Survey of Irish Workers Reveals 30% Surveyed Would Change Jobs if Remote Work Not Facilitated

Survey of Irish Workers Reveals 30% Surveyed Would Change Jobs if Remote Work Not Facilitated

The results of  research carried out by the Whitaker Institute at National University of Ireland (NUI), Galway and the Western Development Commission have revealed that almost one third of workers are willing to move to a new job to secure their remote working preferences.

The survey shows that 30% of respondents will change jobs – even if it means a pay cut – if their remote working preferences are not facilitated

The findings are from the third annual National Remote Working Survey, led by Professor Alma McCarthy and Noreen O’Connor at NUI Galway, and Tomás Ó Síocháin and Deirdre Frost at the Western Development Commission, the organization responsible for promoting social and economic development in Ireland’s Western Region.

The survey gathered responses from more than 8,400 employees on their current experience of remote working.

The vast majority of respondents indicated remote working is impacting employee attraction and retention in their organisation. 88% strongly agree and agree with the statement that their organisation needs to offer remote/hybrid working to attract staff and 90% strongly agree and agree with the statement that their organisation needs to offer remote/hybrid working to retain staff.

Findings include:

  • Of those who could work remotely, 52% were currently working hybrid, 40% fully remotely, and only 8% were fully on-site
  • If their future remote working preferences were not facilitated, 30% of all respondents indicated that they will change job, with 33% indicating they may change jobs even if it meant a pay cut
  • 37% indicated that they will change job and 27% indicated they are open to the possibility of changing jobs, even if it means less promotion opportunities if their future remote working preferences were not facilitated.

Tomás Ó Síocháin, Chief Executive of the Western Development Commission, said, “The findings of the latest national survey highlight a further change in the way we view remote working and indicate that Irish workers expect to continue working remotely either all of the time or to find a balance in line with their lifestyle.”

“Leaders will now be challenged to look at ways of supporting their staff and find that balance to avoid retention issues…”

The survey was published following recent criticism from public sector unions in Ireland of the Government’s proposed changes to legislation on remote and hybrid work.

Image by Luke Peters/Via UnSplash/https://unsplash.com/license

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