Big Names at Bottom of Europe’s Climate League Table

Big Names at Bottom of Europe’s Climate League Table

The majority of European nations will fail to meet carbon reduction pledges made as part of the Paris Agreement, according to a new ‘league table’ published this week by a climate change NGO.

The majority of European nations will fail to meet carbon reduction pledges made as part of the Paris Agreement, according to a new ‘league table’ published this week by a climate change NGO.

Member states are separated into ‘the good, the bad and the ugly’ by Climate Action Network Europe (CAN) which says countries which were once at the forefront of action on climate change appear in the bottom category.

Star performers rated ‘good’ include Sweden, France, Portugal, Luxembourg and the Netherlands while wealthy Belgium, Denmark, Germany and the UK are in the ‘bad’ group, along with most countries in central and eastern Europe.

CAN Europe says the contribution of EU member states to limit the rise in global temperatures to close to 1.5°C is “nowhere close enough.”

The top performers were praised for ambitious climate policies and leading the debate on EU targets of the future, but CAN Europe said no EU country was doing well enough, which is why it left the top spot in its league table empty.

Wendel Trio, Director of CAN Europe said he was “underwhelmed” by “the climate change efforts of Belgium, Denmark, Germany and the UK in particular.

Professor Hermann E. Ott, board member of German League for Nature, Animal and Environment Protection (DNR), said. “Germany has gone from being world champion in climate action to a third division team.”

The report’s timing coincided with Germany and Poland hosting talks on climate change in Berlin, with 35 countries discussing the implementation of the Paris Climate Agreement ahead of the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP24) in Poland in December.

  • Palm oil should cease to be used as fuel by 2030 in Europe under a reform of renewable energy laws agreed after tough negotiations.

From 2020, EU member states will no longer be required to meet a percentage of renewable energy obligations through the use of food-based biofuel, which is expected to reduce demand for palm oil. Campaigners say increased use of palm oil has ousted food crops and caused environmental damage.

Restrictions will also be brought in on palm and soybean oil biofuels, which will not be allowed to exceed each country’s consumption levels of 2019. The 2030 target calls for the use of palm oil to cease altogether.

( Banner image: Flickr )

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